Dangerous Dog

Many local governments that have implemented “dangerous dog” laws that are directed towards specific breeds or types of dogs. These laws assume that all dogs of a certain breed are more likely to bite than other breeds. These laws should be acknowledging that most dogs, of any breed, are not a danger to society.

In reality, there are few dogs that are a true danger to the public and should be considered “dangerous” dogs.

According to the Humane Society of the United States, “no dog should be declared dangerous or potentially dangerous” if any of the following exceptions apply.

  • The dog was used by a law enforcement official for legitimate law enforcement purposes.
  • The threat, injury, or damage was sustained by a person who was committing, at the time, a willful trespass or other tort upon the premises lawfully occupied by the owner of the dog.
  • The threat, injury, or damage was sustained by a person who was provoking, tormenting, abusing, or assaulting the dog or can be shown to have repeatedly, in the past, provoked, tormented, abused, or assaulted the dog.
  • The treat, injury, or damage was sustained by a person who was committing or attempting to commit a crime.
  • The dog was responding to pain or injury or was protecting its offspring.
  • The dog was protecting or defending a human being within the immediate vicinity of the dog from an attack or assault.

Studies show that most dogs bites are caused by mismanagement of dogs and abusive conditions created by dog owners. Dogs who are not properly trained, socialized, or who are cruelly confined and neglected are often those in dog bite accidents when reality these dogs have no control over their environment.